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The Responsive Eye Revisited: Opens Friday

The Responsive Eye Revisited: Opens Friday

The Sewell Centre Gallery today opens the Responsive Eye Revisited 

The Sewell Centre Gallery Responsive Eye Revisited exhibition starts on Friday 15 January and ends on 11 February 2016. It features 22 works of art and includes many of the original artists shown at MOMA in 1965. It is a rare opportunity to see work by Bridget Riley, Antonio Asis, Francois Morelett, Peter Sedgley, Alberto Biasi and others. 

A review by Fergus Wiltshire, 6.2 a social

I have grown up being encouraged to look at art and to seek out galleries and exhibitions wherever I have travelled. I get excited by some shows and struggle to enthuse about others, but I have learnt that a reaction, be it positive or negative, is often the most important thing, and optical art certainly provokes a reaction.

I remember visiting the Bridget Riley retrospective show at the Tate and being asked to name the colours I could see in a rather large painting called Streak from 1979.  This seemed a simple request, but having listed what I was convinced I saw, I was asked to inspect the canvas at close quarters and discovered that I had invented colours that weren’t actually there.  What Riley had done was to intentionally create a painting designed to confuse the eye.  This I found fascinating, this was art that performed, where static images moved, vibrated and even changed colour. 

In this exhibition at Radley I find some works are visually more stimulating than others, but there is one work in particular that confounds all logic for me, Antonio Asis’ 9 Circulos Azul y Negro, 1975”.  In this work the artist has painted a board with small blue, black and white dots which do not appear to have any particular pattern, but by fixing a wire mesh screen, with circular holes the same size as the painted dots in front of the board, the work is transformed.  Squares with perfect circles appear and change colour depending on where you stand, what was seemingly random is now ordered and precise.

Not everybody will of course experience the same reactions to individual works, but I am sure that everyone will find something in this show that surprises and makes them wonder what it’s all about.  Is it really art or just clever visual trickery, I know what I think ……

Fergus Wiltshire, a 

 

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